Über den Fotoblog

Jeden Monat ein anderer Experte. Wir laden bekannte Blogger und Spezialisten aus der internationalen Fotoszene ... Read more »

About the Blog

Another expert every month: We invite well-known bloggers and specialists from the international photography scene... Read more »

Impressions #4: Les Rencontres de la Photographie, Arles

Who’s that dog?

Who’s that dog?

Photography in a wine shop – what more can you ask for?

Photography in a wine shop – what more can you ask for?

Opening of Johanna-Maria Fritz at Anne Clergue Galerie

Opening of Johanna-Maria Fritz at Anne Clergue Galerie

Johanna-Maria Fritz, "Like a Bird"

Johanna-Maria Fritz, “Like a Bird”

Paul Graham, series "American Night"

Paul Graham, series “American Night”

Checking the news – exhibition of Paul Graham

Checking the news – exhibition of Paul Graham

Paul Graham, from the series "Shimmer of Possibility"

Paul Graham, from the series “Shimmer of Possibility”

Paul Graham, from the series "Shimmer of Possibility"

Paul Graham, from the series “Shimmer of Possibility”

Paul Graham, from the series "The Present"

Paul Graham, from the series “The Present”

Street Splitter #01

Street Splitter #01

Installation view of Gregor Seiler "The Potemkin Villages"

Installation view of Gregor Seiler “The Potemkin Villages”

Gregor Seiler, from the Series "The Potemkin Villages"

Gregor Seiler, from the Series “The Potemkin Villages”

In the exhibition of Raymond Depardon

In the exhibition of Raymond Depardon

Raymond Depardon

Raymond Depardon

Raymond Depardon

Raymond Depardon

Nadav Kander, Prix Pictet exhibition

Nadav Kander, Prix Pictet exhibition

Nadav Kander, Prix Pictet exhibition

Nadav Kander, Prix Pictet exhibition

Street Splitter #02

Street Splitter #02

Ann Ray, from the exhibition "The Unfinished – Lee McQueen"

Ann Ray, from the exhibition “The Unfinished – Lee McQueen”

Ann Ray, backstage at a show of Givenchy

Ann Ray, backstage at a show of Givenchy

Ann Ray, Alexander McQueen Show

Ann Ray, Alexander McQueen Show

Ann Ray

Ann Ray

Street Splitter #03

Street Splitter #03

Entrance to the Arles Book Awards exhibition

Entrance to the Arles Book Awards exhibition

At the Book Awards exhibition, RAF No Evidence by Arwed Messmer (Hatje Cantz) on the Shortlist

At the Book Awards exhibition, RAF No Evidence by Arwed Messmer (Hatje Cantz) on the Shortlist

Talking about books at "Cosmos-Arles Books"

Talking about books at “Cosmos-Arles Books”

Instagram pics floating machine installation – at Hyper Media

Instagram pics floating machine installation – at Hyper Media

Hyper Media Lab – very hyper

Hyper Media Lab – very hyper

When Beauty is a moment in time

When Beauty is a moment in time

Chilling in a room full of beauty

Chilling in a room full of beauty

Street Splitter #04

Street Splitter #04

Rene Burri, "The Imaginary Pyramids"

Rene Burri, “The Imaginary Pyramids”

Rene Burri, from the series "The Imaginary Pyramids"

Rene Burri, from the series “The Imaginary Pyramids”

Street Splitter #05 – watch out for "Your Daily Photograph . com"

Street Splitter #05 – watch out for “Your Daily Photograph . com”

Jonas Bendiksen, from the series "The Last Testament"

Jonas Bendiksen, from the series “The Last Testament”

He believes he’s the new Jesus. From the series "The Last Testament" by Jonas Bendiksen

He believes he’s the new Jesus. From the series “The Last Testament” by Jonas Bendiksen

Checking out shorts at Jonas Bendiksen’s show "The Last Testament"

Checking out shorts at Jonas Bendiksen’s show “The Last Testament”

Christto & Andrew, New Discovery Award

Christto & Andrew, New Discovery Award

Christto & Andrew

Christto & Andrew

Street Splitter #06

Street Splitter #06

Street Splitter #07 (ok, actually we have a car here, but the surface is also nice)

Street Splitter #07 (ok, actually we have a car here, but the surface is also nice)

Cristina de Middel & Bruno Morais, "Midnight at the Crossroads"

Cristina de Middel & Bruno Morais, “Midnight at the Crossroads”

Cristina de Middel & Bruno Morais

Cristina de Middel & Bruno Morais

Street Splitter #08

Street Splitter #08

What is love?

What is love?

Street Splitter #09

Street Splitter #09

Sun-Ra rules – even when the sun doesn´t shine

Sun-Ra rules – even when the sun doesn´t shine

Last Night at the Place du Forum

Last Night at the Place du Forum

Impressions 3: Museo Ferragamo, Firenze

Aeroporto di Firenze – announcement for the exhibition »L’Italia a Hollywood« about the influence of Italian actors, directors, make-up artists, writers and stylists on the movie industry in Hollywood in the beginning of the 20th century. Organized by the Museo Ferragamo in collaboration with Fondazione Ferragamo, curated by Giuliana Muscio and Stefania Ricci. On display until March 2019

Aeroporto di Firenze – announcement for the exhibition »L’Italia a Hollywood« about the influence of Italian actors, directors, make-up artists, writers and stylists on the movie industry in Hollywood in the beginning of the 20th century. Organized by the Museo Ferragamo in collaboration with Fondazione Ferragamo, curated by Giuliana Muscio and Stefania Ricci. On display until March 2019

Ferragamo Store in Firenze, movie stills with Paola Negri from the 1920s

Ferragamo Store in Firenze, movie stills with Paola Negri from the 1920s

Exhibition "Italy in Hollywood"

Exhibition “Italy in Hollywood”

Photo of the Gallery 141 with the works by the Futurists displayed a the 1915 Panama-Pacific International Exhibition. On the left can be seen Giacomo Balla’s work »Disgregazione X velocità Penetrazioni dinamiche di automobile«

Photo of the Gallery 141 with the works by the Futurists displayed a the 1915 Panama-Pacific International Exhibition. On the left can be seen Giacomo Balla’s work »Disgregazione X velocità Penetrazioni dinamiche di automobile«

Giacomo Balla’s work »Disgregazione X velocità Penetrazioni dinamiche di automobile«, 1913

Giacomo Balla’s work »Disgregazione X velocità Penetrazioni dinamiche di automobile«, 1913

Installation with silent movies from that time

Installation with silent movies from that time

Tina Modotti as an actress in the movie »The Tiger’s Coat«, 1920

Tina Modotti as an actress in the movie »The Tiger’s Coat«, 1920

Tina Modotti in San Francisco, 1920. Because the movie industry only saw her beauty, Tina soon became tired of Hollywood, quit acting and became a famous photographer herself

Tina Modotti in San Francisco, 1920. Because the movie industry only saw her beauty, Tina soon became tired of Hollywood, quit acting and became a famous photographer herself

Installation with photographs by Tina Modotti and by Edward Weston using Tina Modotti as a model

Installation with photographs by Tina Modotti and by Edward Weston using Tina Modotti as a model

Edward Weston, »Tina on the Azotea", Mexico, 1924

Edward Weston, »Tina on the Azotea”, Mexico, 1924

Rudolph Valentino, iconic male star of the time

Rudolph Valentino, iconic male star of the time

Many Italians were around that time in Hollywood: actress Marcella Battelini, 1927 (above), director Gregory La Cava with Bebe Daniels on the set of »Feel My Pulse« 1928 (middle), Tullio Carminati in the film »Honeymoon Hate«1927

Many Italians were around that time in Hollywood: actress Marcella Battelini, 1927 (above), director Gregory La Cava with Bebe Daniels on the set of »Feel My Pulse« 1928 (middle), Tullio Carminati in the film »Honeymoon Hate«1927

Photographer Manfredi Gioacchini, who captured the contemporary Hollywood

Photographer Manfredi Gioacchini, who captured the contemporary Hollywood

Amleto Cataldi, »La spiga«, 1909

Amleto Cataldi, »La spiga«, 1909

Pio Fedi, »Incontro tra amati«, 1850 (left), Ronaldo Colman and Lillian Gish on the set of »Romola“, 1924

Pio Fedi, »Incontro tra amati«, 1850 (left), Ronaldo Colman and Lillian Gish on the set of »Romola“, 1924

Lillian Gish on the set of »Romola« (left), Copy of Sandro Botticelli’s »Madonna of the Magnificat« (in the middle), Lillian Gish on the set of »Romola«, 1924

Lillian Gish on the set of »Romola« (left), Copy of Sandro Botticelli’s »Madonna of the Magnificat« (in the middle), Lillian Gish on the set of »Romola«, 1924

Work by Piero Fornasetti, Lithograph and seriograph on porcelain, using the face of the famous star Lina Cavalieri. The first plate was done in 1966, today there are over 350

Work by Piero Fornasetti, Lithograph and seriograph on porcelain, using the face of the famous star Lina Cavalieri. The first plate was done in 1966, today there are over 350

Showroom with the collection of shoes by Ferragamo. This is how the original Ferragamo »Boot Shop« looked like in the 1920s in Hollywood, including the sofa

Showroom with the collection of shoes by Ferragamo. This is how the original Ferragamo »Boot Shop« looked like in the 1920s in Hollywood, including the sofa

Pumps by Salvatore Ferragamos: »Décolleté,1926«, »Two-piece shoe«, 1927

Pumps by Salvatore Ferragamos: »Décolleté,1926«, »Two-piece shoe«, 1927

Curator Stefania Ricci welcoming everybody. After her speech the silent movie »Show People« started. Costumes by Salvatore Ferragamo

Curator Stefania Ricci welcoming everybody. After her speech the silent movie »Show People« started. Costumes by Salvatore Ferragamo

Impressions 2: Photo Basel

Entrance of Photo Basel at the Volkshaus Basel

Entrance of Photo Basel at the Volkshaus Basel

Photo Basel 2018

Photo Basel 2018

Galerie STP from Greifswald (art works by Antanas Sutkus)

Galerie STP from Greifswald (art works by Antanas Sutkus)

René Groebli

René Groebli

Alinka Echeverria at The Ravestijn Gallery from Amsterdam

Alinka Echeverria at The Ravestijn Gallery from Amsterdam

Kahmann Gallery from Amsterdam

Kahmann Gallery from Amsterdam

Vincent Mercier at Catherine et André Hug from Paris

Vincent Mercier at Catherine et André Hug from Paris

Galerie Springer from Berlin (art work by Georges Rousse)

Galerie Springer from Berlin (art work by Georges Rousse)

Sascha Weidner at Dorothée Nilsson Gallery from Berlin

Sascha Weidner at Dorothée Nilsson Gallery from Berlin

Books from Sascha Weidner at Dorothée Nilsson Gallery from Berlin

Books from Sascha Weidner at Dorothée Nilsson Gallery from Berlin

Steve McQueen, photographed by Christopher Thomas, at Ira Stehmann Fine Art from Munich

Steve McQueen, photographed by Christopher Thomas, at Ira Stehmann Fine Art from Munich

Miles Aldridge – ok, this was not at Photo Basel, but at Art Basel nearby...

Miles Aldridge – ok, this was not at Photo Basel, but at Art Basel nearby…

Impressions 1: Photo Espana

Cristina de Middel, photographer, who was given this year´s »carta blancha« to chose 5 shows. Her theme: »Players«. The style: playful and nice. With joy, and a great sensibility. Together with Martin Parr she curated the best »games« pictures from the archive of Magnum Photos, Espacio Fundación Telefónica

Cristina de Middel, photographer, who was given this year´s »carta blancha« to chose 5 shows. Her theme: »Players«. The style: playful and nice. With joy, and a great sensibility. Together with Martin Parr she curated the best »games« pictures from the archive of Magnum Photos, Espacio Fundación Telefónica

Installation view of the exhibition »Players. Magnum photographers come out to play«, curated by Cristina de Middel and Martin Parr

Installation view of the exhibition »Players. Magnum photographers come out to play«, curated by Cristina de Middel and Martin Parr

Installation view »Begin at the beginning, and go on till you come to the end: then stop« at CentroCentro

Installation view »Begin at the beginning, and go on till you come to the end: then stop« at CentroCentro

Work by Shirina Shabazi in the group show »Begin at the beginning, and go on till you come to the end: then stop«

Work by Shirina Shabazi in the group show »Begin at the beginning, and go on till you come to the end: then stop«

Carlos Cánovas in his exhibition »In Time« about urban transformation, Museo Ico

Carlos Cánovas in his exhibition »In Time« about urban transformation, Museo Ico

Azu Nwagbog, curator, explaining the concept behind the show of Samuel Fosso, who started making stylised self-portraits to finish off his rolls of film to send to his grandmother who survived the war in Nigeria: »An African Odyssey« at Fernán Gómez

Azu Nwagbog, curator, explaining the concept behind the show of Samuel Fosso, who started making stylised self-portraits to finish off his rolls of film to send to his grandmother who survived the war in Nigeria: »An African Odyssey« at Fernán Gómez

Work by Mama Casset in the exhibition "The Elegant Senegal of the First Half of the 20th Century, at Círculo de Bellas Artes

Work by Mama Casset in the exhibition “The Elegant Senegal of the First Half of the 20th Century, at Círculo de Bellas Artes

Musuk Nolte, winner of the Elliott Erwitt Havana Club 7 Fellowship, in front of his dark and mysterious images of Cuba, at the Casa de América

Musuk Nolte, winner of the Elliott Erwitt Havana Club 7 Fellowship, in front of his dark and mysterious images of Cuba, at the Casa de América

Installation view of Peter Hujar & David Wonjarowicz at the Loewe Foundation, Gran Via

Installation view of Peter Hujar & David Wonjarowicz at the Loewe Foundation, Gran Via

From the exhibition »The Soviet Century: Russian Photography in the Archivo Lafuente (1917-1972), Círculo de Bellas Artes

From the exhibition »The Soviet Century: Russian Photography in the Archivo Lafuente (1917-1972), Círculo de Bellas Artes

About the 1960s coolness of the Costa Brava – by Xavier Miserachs, seen at La Fabrica Bookstore downstairs in their gallery

About the 1960s coolness of the Costa Brava – by Xavier Miserachs, seen at La Fabrica Bookstore downstairs in their gallery

Harald Hauswald, »Daily Life«, at the Goethe-Institut. Harald is one of the founders of Berlin Agency »Ostkreuz«. In this exhibition he shows his best photographs of the GDR in the 80s...

Harald Hauswald, »Daily Life«, at the Goethe-Institut. Harald is one of the founders of Berlin Agency »Ostkreuz«. In this exhibition he shows his best photographs of the GDR in the 80s…

Work by Graciela Iturbide, the great latin american photographer, Centro de Arte Alcobendas

Work by Graciela Iturbide, the great latin american photographer, Centro de Arte Alcobendas

Mária Svarbová shows her exhibition »Swimming Pool« in the shop of Delpozo. The images inspired the label to the whole collection. If you scan the code you can find out more about the design

Mária Svarbová shows her exhibition »Swimming Pool« in the shop of Delpozo. The images inspired the label to the whole collection. If you scan the code you can find out more about the design

Jan van der Til shows his work. No other works are seen. He is asking questions. About his work. You can find those questions on the website of Photo Espana: phe.es – it´s about authorship, art and reality. He´s real, though.

Jan van der Til shows his work. No other works are seen. He is asking questions. About his work. You can find those questions on the website of Photo Espana: phe.es – it´s about authorship, art and reality. He´s real, though.

The front page

As this will be my last post I would like to say thank you to Hatje Cantze and Nadine Barthe for inviting me, and to those who have taken the time to look. I would have liked to write more about the trials of newspaper picture editing, but the job as it were got in the way. So, for this final musing, I am writing about the front page photograph. Out of all the pictures in the newspaper, this must be the most important one.

We had an unusual about turn with the front page picture last week with the Babchenko story, he was the Russian journalist who faked his own death with the help of the Ukrainian secret service. On that day there were pictures around of protesters attaching photographs of Babchenko to the gates of the Russian Embassy in Kiev, it was a front page story but they weren’t good enough front page pictures. When images from the press conference started to come in where he appeared alive, we had an unbelievable story and a great picture to go with it.

We had an unusual about turn with the front page picture last week when Babchenko appeared alive at a news conference.

We begin to discuss the front page picture in our midday editorial meeting. This is when each of the section editors – home news, foreign, business and environment runs through their top stories, the graphics editor explains what information they will be illustrating through maps etc and I make a presentation of the 20 best pictures I have seen so far that day. The key stories are roughly sketched out on the layout – the editor will usually be able to identify what might make the front page splash, what will go on page three, and which stories should open the foreign and business sections.

A classic news picture filled the front when the politician Amber Rudd resigned.

A classic news picture filled the front when the politician Amber Rudd resigned.

On a perfect day we will get a few different things out of the picture show. Hopefully, we will have decided on our Eyewitness picture, the photograph that fills the double pages of the centre spread from Monday to Friday. If there isn’t a stand out image that can fill such a huge space, then finding it will hound me for the rest of the day. The show may also reveal a number of standalone images that can run in the paper on their own merit and sometimes images can prompt a story to be written. There are times however when the nine to ten thousand images I’ve looked through in the morning yield very little in terms of photographs that are any good to print. This seems extraordinary, but believe me, most of the photography I look through is neither good enough nor relevant for the paper.

Guardian centre spread 26 March 2018

A memorable image of a news event that fills the space with interesting detail.

Finally, I hope to get a heads up on what our front page picture might be. There is a certain sense of security knowing more or less what might go on the front, but not all stories will be picturable. A frequent, unnerving scenario is leaving the midday meeting not knowing what will go on the front and not having an Eyewitness.

Guardian centre spread 21 March 2018

This beautiful and striking portrait holds the space despite being deceptively simple.

On some days we have a news piece that has been photographed, other days we have our own pieces of journalism for which we have commissioned photography, but there are also days when the stories on the front can’t be photographed, in those instances we are looking for a news worthy image that will hold the front page with just a caption. It can be a real challenge to find such an image and on these occasions we often have to do a lot of lateral thinking to come up with something. We also have to think about the tone of the picture and how it will work next to the other stories on the front.

We sent our photographer Graeme Robertson to Jamaica to shoot this portrait for the Guardian's ongoing Windrush investigation.

We sent our photographer Graeme Robertson to Jamaica to shoot this portrait for the Guardian’s ongoing Windrush investigation.

The paper goes through many iterations as the day progresses and the stories on the front may be switched as their importance wains or are replaced by breaking news, but even if the main story stays the same we usually wait to decide on the image until late in the afternoon, so we are sure we have seen everything on offer and have chosen the best. It amazes me that sometimes the front page can be completely up in the air until the very last moment when it all miraculously falls in place. Those days leave you reeling with the feeling that you’ve only just gotten away with it, a combination of being high with exhilaration and completely shattered. The question of what makes a good front page picture is I think answered by how immediate its message is. It is all about impact and how we can make the Guardian stand out against competition on the newsstand. For my colleagues working on the website these concerns are from another era, but for me this way of thinking about how pictures function when printed and left out in the real world are what makes the job so interesting.

Today, in pictures

Passing through the Guardian's exhibition space to start the day.

Passing through the Guardian’s exhibition space to start the day.

Pages from today's paper hang on the wall from last night's final run through. The front page picture later changed when new pictures came in from the mass singalong in Manchester to remember the victims of last year's bomb attack.

Pages from today’s paper hang on the wall from last night’s final run through. The front page picture later changed when new pictures came in from the mass singalong in Manchester to remember the victims of last year’s bomb attack.

Today's paper with a joyous front page picture.

Today’s paper with a joyous front page picture.

Meanwhile royalty continue to be pictured on most of the other newspaper's front pages.

Meanwhile royalty continue to adorn most of the other front pages.

Standing room only in morning conference.

Standing room only in morning conference.

At my desk scrolling through pictures, endless pictures.

At my desk scrolling through pictures, endless pictures.

The walls in the office are full of the Guardian's heritage. Original door frames from the Guardian's Manchester office line the corridor to Kath Viner's office – our editor-in-chief, and a facsimile of the first ever Manchester Guardian from 1821 hangs on the wall.

The walls in the office are full of the newspaper’s heritage. Original door frames from the Guardian Manchester office line the corridor to Kath Viner’s office – our editor-in-chief, and a facsimile of the first ever Manchester Guardian from 1821 hangs on the wall.

The flat plan coming together at the end of my shift.

The flat plan coming together at the end of my shift.

Editors, designers and sub editors, all hard at work in the final push of putting the paper together.

Editors, designers and sub editors, all hard at work in the final push to get the paper finished.

I make my way out of the building as colleagues work to put the paper to bed.

I make my way out of the building as colleagues work to put the paper to bed.

The evening sun beckons.

The evening sun beckons.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Two festivals // two exhibitions

Peckham 24

Enjoying the sunshine in the courtyard at Peckham 24

If you ask me the real buzz around photography in London this weekend was south of the river, at the fringe festival Peckham 24. Now in its third year this diminutive festival is well in its stride. The old factory buildings and derelict spaces housed small but thoughtfully curated exhibitions and was the perfect antidote to the heady commercialism of Photo London, held in the grandeur of Somerset House. Two stand-out shows were held in the Copeland Gallery space – My London, curated by Emma Bowkett and Concealer, curated by Tom Lovelace.

johnny

Jonny Briggs, The Silent Image (My ear poking through a photograph of Freud’s garden). Part of My London.

jhv

Penelope Umbrico, Everyone’s Photos Any License. Screenshot 2015-11-04 14.22.59. Part of Concealer

Peckham 24 also hosted talks in a room with the best windows I’ve seen in a long time.

Peckham 24

Audience listen to Hannah Hughes, Daphne Talmor, Jonny Briggs, Bruno V Roels and Yamini Nayar in conversation.

FOAM

Foam Talent at Beaconsfield Gallery in Vauxhall

Tucked away from the luxury apartment buildings rising up around Vauxhall station lies Beaconsfield Gallery, an artist run space in a former Victorian school. This is where Foam has for the third time presented its show of artists to look out for under the age of 35.

FOAM

Video still from Alinka Echeverría, Fieldnotes for Nicephora, 2015

Visitors fill the Somerset House galleries

Visitors fill the Somerset House galleries, photo by Kristina Sälgvik.

Over at Photo London the trick to staying focused and in good humour is to dip in and out (that is if you have the luxury of a weekend ticket). Of course I attempted to see it all in one go and left in a predictably stupefied state.

Edward Burtynsky

Edward Burtynsky, Carrara Marble Quarries, Cava di Canalgrande #2, Carrara, Italy 2016

Burtynsky’s six metre wide mural of the Carrara quarries contains triggers for augmented reality film clips that play on an app when a device is held up to the image on the wall.

webber

Marton Perlaki at Webber Represents

A wonderful collection of Henry Wessel's at Thomas Zander

A wonderful collection of Henry Wessel’s at Galerie Thomas Zander

Further along The Strand in a disused brutalist office building is the exhibition A Shade of Pale, curated by Carrie Scott. Although the show is conceived as an exploration in photographic series that reject linear readings, my overarching impression was about the impact of colour, no doubt accentuated by the cool, concrete location.

180

Marco Walker’s pop art-esq cut-outs explode from a disused safe.

John Pawson's Spectrum

Architect John Pawson‘s chromatic series Spectrum is like walking though a designer’s colour and pattern reference book.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gaza

The photography that has been most on my mind this week has come from Gaza. It has made me think about the experience of looking at disturbing imagery. As a picture editor I look through a lot of photographs each day: by the time I leave work at 7pm I have generally seen approximately 25,000. And on any given day, that feed – which features everything imaginable, and unimaginable – there will be a number of upsetting images.

We view the images that are sent to the Guardian from agencies and individual photographers as a grid of thumbnails. It is a jumble of pictorial juxtapositions. I start scrolling through them at midnight, saving anything that catches my eye. I am looking at formal qualities – composition, light, colour, dynamism – as well as subject matter – the people or events that are in the news. These are all things you learn to recognise from a five-centimetre wide rectangle.

Screengrab from The Guardian's picture grid taken on Monday 13th May

Screengrab taken from The Guardian’s picture grid at 8.40am Monday 14 May

Monday morning was fairly typical, a mixture of entertainment from the night before and pictures taken over the weekend. But slowly images from the protests in Gaza against started to stream in. Protesters were reacting to the opening of the US embassy in Jerusalem, on the eve of the Nakba anniversary the following day. At first there were the images we have become used to, of Palestinian men in T-shirts and jeans throwing rocks and running through clouds of black smoke from burning tyres. But then as the day progressed, there were more and more images of injured people, then bodies being carried away. Over 50 Palestinians died on Monday, the deadliest day in years. The harrowing scenes we witnessed on our screens in the office in London were taken by photographers who were right in the middle of the chaos. Despite being press and wearing flak jackets, they were putting themselves in significant danger. Only last month Palestinian photographer Yasser Murtaja was shot dead covering demonstrations.

The Guardian front page, Tuesday 14 May

The Guardian front page, Tuesday 15 May

Over 1000 images were sent in from Gaza. The images of the protests and the injured appeared alongside others of Ivanka Trump, pristine and glamorous, surrounded by suited politicians and diplomats celebrating the opening of the embassy. The contrast was shocking. So instead of our standard single image on the front of Tuesday’s paper we had two. It was not the most elegant composition, but it was a bold statement that was impossible to misread.

It is surprising how many disturbing pictures you can look at before one jumps out and chills you to the bone. For me it tends to be when a child is involved and there are moments when I need to step away from the screen. It is rare for these images to be published, but there are cases, as with the picture of Alan Kurdi, when the significance of the image is so great that it has to be shared. We are all to some extent numbed to images of suffering, especially when we have seen a lot of pictures from an ongoing tragedy or conflict, but that is when I believe there is an argument for publishing something you would rather look away from. Sometimes we need to be woken up to what is happening. Needless to say there will be a serious discussion involving lots of people about the ethical questions around publishing such an image. When it comes to photographs of conflict we feel more justified in showing death, but people will always deserve privacy and respect. A public funeral may seem like a fair event to picture, but should we be distributing a dead person’s face around the world?  Shouldn’t a family mourning the loss of a child in a morgue be allowed the privacy to do so? Equally though, an image of dead children, for example, can sometimes be seen as evidence of their being used as human shields. It is almost always a case of using your gut instinct and asking yourself if an image feels like an intrusion or a necessity. And how it might be interpreted – or misinterpreted – from a political perspective.

Discussion is important in figuring out how we should tell a story, but it is also important for us as a way of dealing with the images we look at. I am almost always working with another picture editor and we talk endlessly about the images we are looking at. It is impossible not to voice a reaction to something that grabs you. It is vital that we have strong reactions to images and aren’t just completely numbed to them, because we have to be able to put ourselves into the mind of the reader, coming to that one image afresh.

Balthasar Burkhard

Fotomuseum Winterthur and Fotostiftung Schweiz

Balthasar Burkhard at Fotomuseum Winterthur and Fotostiftung Schweiz

I am in Switzerland for a few days visiting my brother who happens to live in Winterthur, home of the Swiss foundation of photography and Fotomuseum Winterthur. These world famous institutions, tucked away in unassuming old factory buildings outside the city centre are always worth a visit. I’ve arrived just in time to catch the Balthasar Burkhard retrospective exhibition, which spans both spaces and closes on the 21st of May. I must admit this was my first encounter with the Swiss photographer and it was full of welcome surprises.

Burkhard’s early career, displayed in the foundation building, was largely shaped by his friendship with the influential and charasmatic curator Harald Szeemann who brought him into contact with the avant garde artists of the day. He spent much of the 1960s and 70s immersed in the Swiss and international art scene where he documented the performances and exhibition openings of artists such as Paul Thek, Vito Acconci and Joseph Beuys. His fly on the wall snapshots make this legendary and vibrant period of art making feel both familiar and playful, and they reflect how close Burkhard was to the people he photographed. 

Documentarist of the International Art Scene

Documentarist of the International Art Scene

While Burkhard’s documentary photographs are printed in the small scale you expect from 35mm film, his own creations are enlarged at an increasingly grand scale. This mode of display distanced him from the documentary photography he had been engrossed in and distinguished these pictures as artworks. The monumental photograph, which eventually defined his practice, began with the Amsterdam Canvases, 1969-70, a series of almost life size images printed onto canvas and made in collaboration with artist Markus Raetz.

The Amsterdam Canvases 1969-1970

The Amsterdam Canvases 1969-1970

The giant tableaus shot almost exclusively in black and white that Burkhard became known for fill the Fotomuseum across the road. There is a shared sense of an almost scientific pursuit in each of the series presented here. Whether the focus is on body parts, portraits of animals or landscapes, Burkhard explored the technical and aesthetic potential of the photographic medium.

Portraits: Types and Individuals

Camel, 1997. Estate Balthasar Burkhard

Landscape and Flora

Mountains. Estate Balthasar Burkhard

Body and Sculpture

The Knie, 1983. Estate Balthasar Burkhard

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The garden

Peter Fischli and David Weiss, Untitled, 1997–98; from the series Flowers and Mushrooms © Peter Fischli and David Weiss, Courtesy Matthew Marks Gallery

Peter Fischli and David Weiss, Untitled, 1997–98; from the series Flowers and Mushrooms © Peter Fischli and David Weiss, Courtesy Matthew Marks Gallery

Monday was the hottest May Day holiday on record in the UK and I did what countless others in the country were doing, gardening. I live on a narrowboat, so my garden consists of pots dotted around on the roof and foredeck. It was glorious at first, but soon became unbearably hot. Needless to say, no serious gardener would dream of potting new plants in the scorching midday sun. So, I retreated indoors and enjoyed my love for nature vicariously through The Photographer in the Garden, a wonderful anthology co-published by Aperture and the George Eastman Museum with texts by Jamie M. Allen and Sarah Anne McNear.

The book takes you on a journey from the early days of photography when the garden at Laycock Abbey beckoned Henry Fox Talbot with light and an abundance of static subjects to study, to the streets of London’s Hackney borough where contemporary artist Stephen Gill experiments with photography and nature to intoxicating effect. There is a wealth of image making, mainly from the US, that is explored through themes such as Paradise Garden and The Gardeners. What strikes me when perusing these pages is how such incredibly diverse practitioners have all been drawn to photographing plants, gardens and the people they inhabit.

Imogen Cunningham, Magnolia Blossom, 1925 © 2018 Imogen Cunningham Trust, All rights reserved, Courtesy George Eastman Museum, Purchase

Imogen Cunningham, Magnolia Blossom, 1925 © 2018 Imogen Cunningham Trust, All rights reserved, Courtesy George Eastman Museum, Purchase

There are pictorialists like Clarence H. White, who set their fairy tale scenes in dark glens, modernists like Imogen Cunningham who saw the very structure of flowers as majestic forms and documentary photographers like Martin Parr who revel in the rich colours and charm found in tourists visiting gardens, to name just a few. There are also found pictures taken by people much like myself who can’t help but capture flowers blooming or friends gathering for a picnic.

I am also struck by how the fascination with nature and our interaction with it has hardly changed since the beginning of photography. For instance, the desire to extract, dissect, document and examine plant life is carried through from the earliest botanical photograms made in cyanotype by Anna Atkins to contemporary image makers like Jo Whaley whose botanical studies are very sculptural.

I was surprised and touched to see August Sander’s everyday photographs of tomatoes growing on his roof garden and I keep turning back to Joel Sternfeld’s beautiful portrait of a blind man in his garden.

Jeanette Bernard, Two women with wheelbarrow, ca. 1900, Courtesy George Eastman Museum, Gift of Harvey S. Shipley Miller and J. Randall Plummer

Jeanette Bernard, Two women with wheelbarrow, ca. 1900, Courtesy George Eastman Museum, Gift of Harvey S. Shipley Miller and J. Randall Plummer

Joel Meyerowitz, Vivian, Bronx Botanical Gardens, New York City, 1966 © Joel Meyerowitz, Courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery

Joel Meyerowitz, Vivian, Bronx Botanical Gardens, New York City, 1966 © Joel Meyerowitz, Courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery

Bill Owens, Before the dissolution of our marriage my husband and I owned a bar. One day a toilet broke andwe brought it home. 1971 © Bill Owens

Bill Owens, Before the dissolution of our marriage my husband and I owned a bar. One day a toilet broke and we brought it home. 1971 © Bill Owens

Andrew Buurman, Untitled, Birmingham, UK, 2004; from the series Allotments, © Andrew Buurman, Courtesy George Eastman Museum, Purchase with funds from the Charina Foundation

Andrew Buurman, Untitled, Birmingham, UK, 2004; from the series Allotments, © Andrew Buurman, Courtesy George Eastman Museum, Purchase with funds from the Charina Foundation

In keeping with today’s theme, I sign off with a picture taken from my own garden.

A geranium on the deck.